Nuclear Medicine









Nuclear medicine imaging procedures are noninvasive and, with the exception of intravenous injections, are usually painless medical tests that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers.


Depending on the type of nuclear medicine exam, the radiotracer is either injected into the body, swallowed or inhaled as a gas and eventually accumulates in the organ or area of the body being examined. Radioactive emissions from the radiotracer are detected by a special camera or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information.


Click here for information on How to Prepare for Your Nuclear Medicine Procedure

Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or treat a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential to identify disease

​in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions.

Mammography is a specific type of imaging that uses a low-dose x-ray system to examine breasts. A mammography exam, called a mammogram, is used to aid in the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women.


An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing 

Mammography- Mammogram








a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.


Three recent advances in mammography include digital mammography, computer-aided detection and breast tomosynthesis.


Click here for information on How to Prepare for Your Mammogram

Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography,  involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an image.

Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging or a PET scan, is a type of nuclear medicine imaging.


Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or treat a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. 

CT Scan- Computed Tomography









CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels typically provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels.


Using specialized equipment and expertise to create and interpret CT scans of the body, radiologists can more easily diagnose problems such as cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, appendicitis, trauma and musculoskeletal disorders.


Click here for information on How to Prepare for Your CT Scan


MRI- Magnetic Resonance Imaging









transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).


Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases.


Click here for information on How to Prepare for Your MRI


ARG is the only group in Acadiana offering a wide variety of radiology subspecialties. In addition to our extensive list of services, we are committed to providing you and your physician with timely, accurate results.


Our services include, but are not limited to:


  • MRI
  • CT
  • Pet Scan
  • Ultrasound
  • Mammography
  • Nuclear Medicine
  • X-Ray
  • Bone Density Scan
  • Interventional Radiology

Preparing for Your Procedure

Read more on  preparing for your upcoming procedure: 


MRI, CT Scan, Pet Scan, UltraSound, Mammogram, Nuclear Medicine, etc...

Our Locations

ARG provides professional radiology services to ten healthcare facilities in the Acadiana area. read more

Health Plans

Acadiana Radiology Group is a network provider for the following health plans:


 - Advantage
- HealthPlan HMO
- Aetna PPO*
- BC Preferred Care PPO
- Benefit Management Service
- Best Care PPO - Beech Street *
- Blue Cross Key *
- CIGNA *
- Community Care Network
- Coventry *
- FARA PPO
- First Health Network
- Gilsbar 360 PPO *
- Healthcare Advantage
- Humana
- Humana/Choice Care *
- National Provider Network *
- PHCS/Multiplan *
- PPO USA GEHA
- PPO Plus
- St. Clare's Medical Home Clin
- State of LA
- Three Rivers Network *
- Tricare/ChampVA**
- United Healthcare PPO *
- Verity PPO
- NPPN*
- US DOL -OWCP *
- OGB*
- One Call Medical*


There are many variables that determine in-network status, so we recommend that you contact your health plan directly prior to scheduling a procedure.

Services

Meet Our Team

Click here to learn more about our experienced team of radiologists.  

An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

A bone x-ray makes images of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot.

Ultrasound Imaging- Sonography









Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays), thus there is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.


Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images.


Click here for information on How to Prepare for Your Ultrasound

PET Scan- Positron Emission Tomography









Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions.

Nuclear medicine imaging procedures are noninvasive and, with the exception of intravenous injections, are usually painless medical tests that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers.

Click here for information on How to Prepare for Your PET Scan


Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.


MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor,

Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD.

Bone density scanning, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or bone densitometry, is an enhanced form of x-ray technology that is used to measure bone loss. DXA is today's established standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD).


An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body.

ACADIANA RADIOLOGY GROUP

THE POWER OF PRECISION

Bone Density Scan









X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. DXA is most often performed on the lower spine and hips. In children and some adults, the whole body is sometimes scanned. Peripheral devices that use x-ray or ultrasound are sometimes used to screen for low bone mass. In some communities, a CT scan with special software can also be used to diagnose or monitor low bone mass (QCT). This is accurate but less commonly used than DXA scanning.

Click here for information on How to Prepare for Your Bone Density Scan